Raid of No Return (Nathan Hale’s Hazardous Tales #7): A World War II Tale of the Doolittle Raid

On December 7, 1941, the Japanese bombed Pearl Harbor, officially bringing the United States into World War II. A new generation of pilots were recruited to fly bombing missions for the United States, and from that group, volunteers were requested for a dangerous secret assignment. For the first time in American history, Army bombers would be launched from an aircraft carrier. Once at sea, they were told their mission was a retaliation strike against targets in Tokyo. But on the day of the raid, a Japanese patrol boat spotted them and they had to launch early, with barely enough fuel to get them past their target.

After the bombing, some pilots crashed, some were captured, and many ended up in mainland China and were carried to safety by Chinese villagers, being hunted by Japanese forces all the while. With tales of high-flying action and bravery, Raid of No Return is a story of heartbreak and survival during wartime.

From School Library Journal

Gr 3–7—Presented in the author's instantly recognizable artistic and storytelling style, this new series installment centers on the Doolittle air raid over Japan during World War II. The book starts with a brief explanation of events pre—Pearl Harbor (and an even briefer, information-packed history of Japanese military history); soon after, the action begins with a literal bang. Hale describes the bombing of Pearl Harbor from Japanese and American points of view. In response, the U.S. military set up a supersecret counterattack organized by stunt pilot Jimmy Doolittle. Pilots and crew manning 16 planes trained to bomb targets over Japan. Their fate after the attack is harrowing and no detail is left out. While small, the panels are readable, and the graphic novel's small size makes it portable. Though works of history might not fly off the shelves, Hale's tendency to incorporate character commentary, infographics, and fun facts will draw readers. VERDICT Purchase for all libraries, and give this title to readers interested in action-packed graphic novels, especially patrons aging out of the "Magic Treehouse" books.—Morgan Brickey, Arlington Public Library, TX

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